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Preparations for Next Moonwalk Simulations Underway (and Underwater)

It’s almost time for NASA’s supersonic X-59 airplane to make its red, white, and blue public debut, and you’re invited to join friends and family in taking a front-row, virtual VIP seat to the rollout ceremony in the California high desert.

As a historic milestone in aviation history, NASA is encouraging people across the nation and around the world to get together and celebrate the occasion by hosting a watch party to view the rollout festivities from their classrooms, homes, or anywhere else.

Although NASA won’t provide snacks and refreshments, the agency does have some ideas to help you host a successful watch party. They include printable invitations, links to STEM-related activities, and a complete X-59 Watch Party Planning Guide.

The centerpiece of NASA’s Quesst mission to study sound and help reduce the sonic boom made by supersonic flight to a sonic thump, the Lockheed Martin-built X-59 is scheduled to be rolled out from the company’s Skunk Works hangar in Palmdale, California on Jan. 12.

The X-59’s rollout ceremony will be broadcast live on the NASA+ streaming service beginning at 4 p.m. EST on Jan. 12, 2024. The event also will air live on the NASA app, YouTube, and on the agency’s website. Viewers can also learn how to stream NASA TV through a variety of platforms, including social media.

If you’re ready to commit to hosting an X-59 rollout ceremony watch party let us know and we’ll add your location to our world map, where a growing list of dozens of sites are already signed up.

All the details for signing up and more are available on our Watch Party web page

About the Author

Jim Banke

Managing Editor/Senior Writer

Jim Banke is a veteran aviation and aerospace communicator with more than 35 years of experience as a writer, producer, consultant, and project manager based at Cape Canaveral, Florida. He is part of NASA Aeronautics’ Strategic Communications Team and is Managing Editor for the Aeronautics topic on the NASA website.